Articles

Articles

Resources we recommend

We have carefully chosen these articles to help you in your adoption journey. These resources are provided by other organizations, and do not always represent the views of the Post Adoption Resource Center.

All Articles Projection

  • Parenting a Child Who Has Experienced Trauma

    Parenting a Child Who Has Experienced Trauma

    Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway

    Children who have experienced traumatic events need to feel safe and loved. All parents want to provide this kind of nurturing home for their children. However, when parents do not have an understanding of the effects of trauma, they may misinterpret their child’s behavior and end up feeling frustrated or resentful. Their attempts to address troubling behavior may be ineffective or, in some cases, even harmful.

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  • Parenting a Child Who Has Experienced Abuse or Neglect

    Parenting a Child Who Has Experienced Abuse or Neglect

    Source: Child Welfare Information Gateway

    Children who have been abused or neglected need safe and nurturing relationships that address the effects of child maltreatment. If you are parenting a child who has been abused or neglected, you might have questions about your child’s experiences and the effects of those experiences.

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  • Talking to Adopted Children About Birth Parents and Families of Origin: How to Answer the “Hard Questions”

    Talking to Adopted Children About Birth Parents and Families of Origin: How to Answer the “Hard Questions”

    Source: National Council for Adoption

    In the September 2015 issue of NCFA's Adoption Advocate, Rhonda Jarema writes about the importance of talking with adopted children about their birth families, and offers some suggestions for adoptive parents.

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  • Talking to Your Child About Adoption: Recommendations for Parents

    Talking to Your Child About Adoption: Recommendations for Parents

    Source: National Council for Adoption

    While recognizing that it can be uncomfortable for parents to discuss adoption with their children, in the December 2011 issue of NCFA's Adoption Advocate, Nicole Callahan offers advice to help parents create an open, honest, and age appropriate dialogue with their children. She emphasizes the importance of beginning this conversation early to help a child feel secure in their identity and facilitate further conversations.

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  • The Adopted Child: Trauma and Its Impact

    The Adopted Child: Trauma and Its Impact

    Source: The Post Institute

    Whether adopted from birth or later in life, all adopted children have experienced some degree of trauma. Trauma is any stressful event which is prolonged, overwhelming, or unpredictable. Though we are familiar with events impacting children such as abuse, neglect, and domestic violence, until recently, the full impact of trauma on adopted children has not been understood.

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  • Transracial Resources

    Transracial Resources

    Source: North American Council on Adoptable Children

    The resources below were identified by Deb Reisner, NACAC’s parent support specialist who facilitates NACAC’s support services for transracial adoptive families in Minnesota.

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  • Supporting Maltreated Children: Countering the Effects of Neglect and Abuse

    Supporting Maltreated Children: Countering the Effects of Neglect and Abuse

    Source: North American Council on Adoptable Children

    The most important property of humankind is the capacity to form and maintain relationships. These relationships are absolutely necessary for any of us to survive, learn, work, ...

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  • 4 Ways to Help Your Adopted/Foster Child Through Mother's Day and Other Holidays

    4 Ways to Help Your Adopted/Foster Child Through Mother's Day and Other Holidays

    Source: Institute For Attachment and Child Development

    For most adopted children and those in foster care, the three most difficult days of the year are Mother’s Day, Christmas or Hanukkah, and the child’s birthday. These special days often bring about feelings of loneliness, sadness, and grief for a child who has been hurt. Children may be missing birth parents, foster parents, siblings or other important people in their lives.

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  • What to Do If Your Child Discloses Sexual Abuse

    What to Do If Your Child Discloses Sexual Abuse

    Source: The National Child Traumatic Stress Network

    Disclosure is when a child tells another person that he or she has been sexually abused. Disclosure can be a scary and difficult process for children. Some children who have been sexually abused may take weeks, months, or even years to fully reveal what was done to them. Many children never tell anyone about the abuse.

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  • Parenting After Trauma: Understanding Your Child’s Needs

    Parenting After Trauma: Understanding Your Child’s Needs

    Source: American Academy of Pediatrics and Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption

    All children need homes that are safe and full of love. Children who have experienced severe trauma may need more. Early, hurtful experiences can cause children to see and react in different ways. Some children who have been adopted or placed into foster care need help to cope with what happened to them in the past. Knowing what experts say about early trauma can help you work with your child.

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  • What Teachers Should Know About Adoption

    What Teachers Should Know About Adoption

    Source: QICAG

    You may be wondering what information you should be giving to your child’s teacher about his or her adoption. Here is a link to a great article that addresses exactly that.

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